St. Lawrence University

Students at St. Lawrence University work with digital tools across the curriculum. On occasion, an opportunity arises for an exemplary student to extend his or her experience through independent study, work-study, a capstone experience (senior seminar/honors project), or a fellowship/apprenticeship program. Some of our current partnerships include the New York Six Instructional Technology Apprenticeship Program, the Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (HASTAC) Scholars Program, the Crossing Boundaries Mellon Humanities grant, and the New York Six Humanities Think Tank Student Fellows Program.

Daniel Banta

Position: 
Digital Media Specialist

Description

Daniel Banta’s Digital Humanities Fellowship has been invested in research, and in learning how to make research public through the web.  Daniel has been developing a web site with Eric Williams-Bergen, Director of Digital Initiatives, for Elun Gabriel’s Spring 2017 History course on genocide, and he specifically has been researching the Rwandan genocide of 1994. 

Using the mapping software CARTO, Daniel has been mapping massacre sites in Rwanda and uploading research he has found relevant to what happened at the locale.  This documentation includes materials such as newspaper articles, narrative accounts, and United Nations reports.  The idea is that students in Dr. Gabriel’s class will have this material to begin their work, and then can add to it as they begin their own research.  “It’s very much in the spirit of a Wiki.”  In discussing the project Daniel also added, “I once saw a map-based visualization of World War Two and that was an inspiration.  It also started a conversation with Elun, who offered me this research assistantship.  I really didn’t have a great deal of background with either the Rwandan genocide or technology, so it’s been a lot of learning by doing.  Hard, I’ll admit, at times…”

Daniel Banta

Holly Brown

Position: 
Student Fellow

Description

Holly Brown graduated from St. Lawrence University in 2014 with a major in English (creative writing focus). She was awarded a SLU Fellowship for the summer of 2013 to support nine weeks studying poetry of the Adirondacks.

Her experience as a creative writer goes back to high school, but she began writing poetry in a more serious academic setting around 2012. After taking Techniques of Poetry and Advanced Poetry Workshop courses, she began to explore additional opportunities to study and write poetry.

“This fellowship allowed me the time and resources to continue my poetic education through both reading and writing,”  

Holly Brown

Hannah Chanatry

Position: 
Student Fellow
HASTAC Scholar

Description

Hannah Chanatry, class of 2015, double-majored in English and Performance and Communication Arts at St. Lawrence University. She participated in off-campus study in Rome in the fall of 2013. Chanatry was awarded a SLU fellowship in 2014 and spent nine weeks that summer developing a new student publication dedicated to publishing first-person, student narratives about off campus study.

“I am interested in just about every sector of the arts, and using those arts to transcend cultural and national boundaries,” Chanatry said in 2014. “I am an avid writer and editor, a passionate feminist, and an amateur dancer, musician, and photographer.”

After graduating, Chanatry said, she hopes to travel abroad, explore other countries and cultures, and complete a Master's degree in the United Kingdom.

Hannah Chanatry

Jacqui Colt

Position: 
Student Fellow

Description

Jacqui Colt graduated from St. Lawrence University in 2015 with a major in English (creative writing focus). She spent much of her time at St Lawrence discovering and learning as much as possible about the Adirondacks. She remained in the area for two North Country summers and spent a semester in an Adirondack yurt village.

“The region feels more like home than ever,” Colt said at the end of her junior year. “It only felt right, after years of hiking, paddling, and otherwise physically investigating the region, to explore the Adirondacks academically.”

Colt received a SLU Fellowship, funded by the Daniel F. ’65 and Ann H. Sullivan Endowment for Student/Faculty Research University Fellowship and the Betty Buchanan Dunn ’53 University Fellowship, and thus was able to spend the summer of 2014 learning about Adirondack literature and contributing to the Adirondack Bibliography project. 

Jacqui Colt

Bryea Coutu

Position: 
Project Assistant Paths to the Buddha

Description

Bryea Coutu, class of 2016, is a History major, Religious Studies minor at St. Lawrence University. Bryea has worked on the “Pilgrimages—Chichibu to Canton Project” at St. Lawrence University for the 2014/2015 academic year. She is currently working with Professor Mark MacWilliams, a specialist on Japanese pilgrimage who has taken several research trips over the years to Chichibu, Japan to study its famous pilgrimage, Bryea’s major area of responsibility is to edit and prepare high quality photographs of collections of Japanese pilgrimage material culture for the virtual Chichibu museum.

The project, which is now stored online as a digital ebook on “Scalar,” is a multiyear effort to document photos, and various religious objects related to the worship of Kannon, the Buddhist bodhisattva of compassion. These materials, which were taken or collected on site will offer viewers a detailed understanding of the 34 temple Kannon pilgrimage in Chichibu Japan. Through her work, the first on-line museum of photo collections and interpretative materials are publicly available on the Internet for the use of scholars and the public.

Bryea Coutu

Jay Fuhrman

Position: 
ITAP Apprentice

Description

Jay Fuhrman graduated from St. Lawrence in 2014. He studied Philosophy with minors in English and Spanish and was an ITAP apprentice throughout the 2014-15 school year. During the spring semester of his junior year, Jay participated in SLU’s off campus program in Madrid, Spain. Passionate about travel, the outdoors, and working with kids, Jay spent summer of 2014 leading a group of high school students on a bike tour down the west coast and looks forward to leading another one in 2015.

Currently, Jay is a co-teacher at the Greenwich Country Day School in Connecticut. He strives to implement various learning technologies in his teaching regularly and draws on his experience from the ITAP program. Some of his (and his students’) favorite lessons are those that incorporate iPads and computer programs such as BeeBot and Scratch. He hopes to continue cultivating his interest in educational technology as he progresses in his career and potentially graduate school.

Jay Fuhrman

Alexander Gladwin

Position: 
HASTAC Scholar

Description

Alexander Gladwin, class of 2014, double-majored in English and mathematics and completed honors projects in both majors. In 2014, he won both the Douglas and Sylvia Angus Literature Award for St. Lawrence University’s top English major and was one of six mathematics majors to receive the Dr. O. Kenneth Bates Prize for Mathematics. He served as St Lawrence University’s 2013-14 HASTAC scholar. Matthew Lavin, Associate Program Coordinator of the Crossing Boundaries Mellon Humanities Grant, served as his HASTAC mentor. For his honors project in mathematics, Alex worked with Associate Professor of Mathematics Daniel M. Look (in consultation with Lavin) to devise a quantitative authorship attribution study focused upon H.P. Lovecraft’s ostensible role in the revision of C.M. Eddy’s most well known short story "The Loved Dead."

Alexander Gladwin

Laurel Hurd

Position: 
Student Fellow

Description

Laurel Hurd ’16 is a St. Lawrence University student research fellow. The purpose of the fellowship was to create an interactive mapping and timeline project using an extensive archive of sticker street art from all over Spain. 

Collaborating with her mentor Catherine Tedford, who for several years has been building a digital archive of street art stickers from around the world, Laurel was able to catalogue a variety of stickers and create exhibitions revealing different social, political and economic events in Spain from the 1970s to present day.  Hurd and Tedford are working with Eric Williams-Bergen to create a web-based digital platform to support the project.

Laurel Hurd

Chloe McElligott

Position: 
Weave Contributor

Description

 Chloe McElligott ’16 is a Global Studies and Anthropology double major. She has been a part of the Weave since her fall semester of her first year at SLU. Through the Weave, Chloe was able to attend the National Conference for Media Reform 2013 in Denver, CO, and later has gone on to become an intern and blogger (focusing mostly on rural poverty). Chloe worked with other Weavers to create videos for “Big Questions,” an interviewing and archiving project inspired by Dropping Knowledge. The filming and editing experience she gained while interning for the Weave has been very valuable to Chloe throughout her St. Lawrence career. With help from the Weave, the Global Studies Department, and Professor Natalia Singer, she and two other students (Anna Kowanko and April VanOrman) received a grant from the university’s Mellon Humanities Grant. This grant provided funds so that she and the other students could create a short documentary film about seed sovereignty in India while they studied abroad in the 2014 fall semester.

“My experience with the Weave helped me connect what we learn about in Global Studies and Anthropology classes to my study abroad experience, and provided me with knowledge about how to convey that information through film. The stories about seed sovereignty, the effects that the Green Revolution have had on farmers and biodiversity, that is exactly the kind of underreported story that work with the Weave has taught me to explore. This is the kind of thing that the public needs to know about so that a real conversation can start about connections between food, poverty, and power.”

This summer, Chloe will be working at Traditional Arts of Upstate New York (TAUNY) in Canton through the SLU Public Interest Corp internships. She will work on archiving materials and turning them into a digital collection, as well as continuing with a few new video projects for the organization. 

Chloe McElligott

Borjana Nikolić

Position: 
ITAP Apprentice

Description

Borjana Nikolić, class of 2018, studies mathematics. Brojana hails from Bosnia and Herzegovina where she graduated from United World College in Mostar. Prior to arriving to the U.S., she spent most of her time engaged in various language learning, math and music endeavors— from writing articles promoting alternative music culture (with a special focus on the Balkans) for two music webzines, to working as math and English tutor. Borjana will work with ITAP for fall 2015 through spring 2016.

About ITAP
Under the umbrella of the NY6 Consortium, the Educational Technology Group have put together the ITAP program to give students practical, hands-on, educational technology experiences in an IT environment. The ITAP program is designed for students who are interested in coupling their liberal arts degree with paraprofessional experiences in the field of instructional technology.

Borjana Nikolić

Ryan Schwallie

Position: 
ITAP Apprentice

Description

Ryan Schwallie graduated from St. Lawrence University in 2015 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. Ryan began working for the Information Technology department in the spring of his sophomore year and filled positions at the Help Desk, Setup Room and as a Field Technician. In the spring semester of his junior year he was accepted into New York Six’ Instructional Technology Apprenticeship Program (ITAP) and worked closely with the Educational Technology group.

During his time as an apprentice Ryan developed and implemented a Photoshop workshop series that was later presented at EDUCAUSE’s NERCOMP in Providence, Rhode Island. “The ITAP program was a great outlet for my technical skills in a creative and open environment. I learned a tremendous amount from my mentor, colleagues at St. Lawrence, as well as colleagues from the rest of the NY6.”  After graduating, Ryan accepted a position at Cornell University’s Central IT department with aspirations of continuing his work with Educational Technology. 

Ryan Schwallie